xntrek


  1. One thing it does not do is, in fact, excel … 

    One thing it does not do is, in fact, excel … 

  2. I don’t know the answer … but I can say without a doubt that …

    dipshits. 

    This is the epitome of the ignorance* I have to deal with that drives me insane. Whether at work, on the internet or in any other aspect of my life, I am all for a good ol’ fashioned vigorous debate about pretty much anything, but the moment this (or a deviation of said) sentence is uttered, I just want to whack them with the wrong end of a shovel.

    *Ignorance ≠ stupid. Smart people can (and often are) just as ignorant as anyone else. Ignorance is a state of mental blindness that allows the mind to be smothered in a blanket of darkness that hides the stars of wonder that rest in the sky of knowledge.

    Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity.

    — Martin Luther King, Jr.

  3. 3drunkencelts:

creativehouses: Multnomah Whiskey Library, Portland, Oregon


Oh, Please, with a limitless credit and a thank you.

    3drunkencelts:

    creativehouses: Multnomah Whiskey Library, Portland, Oregon

    Oh, Please, with a limitless credit and a thank you.

    (via woodsman)

  4. smartasshat:

kateceratops:

The new Alexander Wang collection for H&M has been done before.


My mother was a technical writer for Wang in their heyday in the Eighties. She wrote instruction manuals for the software. I remember her being frustrated with the “correct” way to use quotation marks. (See what I did there?) She had to tell people exactly what commands to type, but according to the rules of English, punctuation had to go inside the quotation marks. So she had to either make it look like she didn’t know how to write, or have people potentially enter the wrong commands. I’ll have to ask her what she decided on.She’s a big fan of the Oxford comma, BTW.

Remember, Wang Cares!

    smartasshat:

    kateceratops:

    The new Alexander Wang collection for H&M has been done before.

    My mother was a technical writer for Wang in their heyday in the Eighties. She wrote instruction manuals for the software. I remember her being frustrated with the “correct” way to use quotation marks. (See what I did there?) She had to tell people exactly what commands to type, but according to the rules of English, punctuation had to go inside the quotation marks. So she had to either make it look like she didn’t know how to write, or have people potentially enter the wrong commands. I’ll have to ask her what she decided on.

    She’s a big fan of the Oxford comma, BTW.

    Remember, Wang Cares!

  5. The salad patch is coming along nicely, with cos, endive, arugala, silverbeet, spinach, beetroot, baby carrots and spring onions all flourishing… Potatoes have sprung up and tomato seedlings have popped up too.

    The salad patch is coming along nicely, with cos, endive, arugala, silverbeet, spinach, beetroot, baby carrots and spring onions all flourishing… Potatoes have sprung up and tomato seedlings have popped up too.

  6. 
The Godmother of Feminist Sci-Fi Finally Won a National Book Award


About time too.
  7. ☛ Riley Norton's Weblog: Multi organ failure, back to cath lab

    onesmallfire:

    Many of you who know me also know Summer. For the rest of you, please join us in support of Riley and his family. This is going to be a long road, but it doesn’t have to be a lonely one.

  8. I think the only reason I’ve had the career life that I’ve had is that someone told me some secrets early on about living. You can do the very best you can when you’re very, very relaxed, no matter what it is or what your job is, the more relaxed you are the better you are…I realized the more fun I had, the better I did it. And I thought, that’s a job I could be proud of. It’s changed my life learning that, and it’s made me better at what I do.
  9. Millions of people never analyze themselves. Mentally they are mechanical products of the factory of their environment, preoccupied with breakfast, lunch, and dinner, working and sleeping, and going here and there to be entertained. They don’t know what or why they are seeking, nor why they never realize complete happiness and lasting satisfaction. By evading self-analysis, people go on being robots, conditioned by their environment. True self-analysis is the greatest art of progress.
    (via elige)

    (via missmireille)

  10. [I]t is actually more expensive to be poor than not poor. If you can’t afford the first month’s rent and security deposit you need in order to rent an apartment, you may get stuck in an overpriced residential motel. If you don’t have a kitchen or even a refrigerator and microwave, you will find yourself falling back on convenience store food, which—in addition to its nutritional deficits—is also alarmingly overpriced. If you need a loan, as most poor people eventually do, you will end up paying an interest rate many times more than what a more affluent borrower would be charged. To be poor—especially with children to support and care for—is a perpetual high-wire act.

    It Is Expensive to Be Poor | The Atlantic  (via america-wakiewakie)

    Reblog this forever. I’ll never forget how many of my students in the school I worked in with a 100% free and reduced lunch rate lived in residential motels and how many of them relied on the school to get breakfast and lunch and how often those were their only meals for the day.

    Or how my friends who have older cars have to spend so much money repairing them but an older car was all they could afford in the first place.

    And how you literally have no safety net because if you already fixed one thing on your car and something else goes a week later, you’ve already spent the little bit of buffer you saved up.

    (via raindropprincess)

    “The reason that the rich were so rich, Vimes reasoned, was because they managed to spend less money.

    Take boots, for example. He earned thirty-eight dollars a month plus allowances. A really good pair of leather boots cost fifty dollars. But an affordable pair of boots, which were sort of OK for a season or two and then leaked like hell when the cardboard gave out, cost about ten dollars. Those were the kind of boots Vimes always bought, and wore until the soles were so thin that he could tell where he was in Ankh-Morpork on a foggy night by the feel of the cobbles.

    But the thing was that good boots lasted for years and years. A man who could afford fifty dollars had a pair of boots that’d still be keeping his feet dry in ten years’ time, while the poor man who could only afford cheap boots would have spent a hundred dollars on boots in the same time and would still have wet feet.

    This was the Captain Samuel Vimes ‘Boots’ theory of socioeconomic unfairness.”

    (via moniquill)

    (via divination)


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